Personal Fitness – Six Things You Will not Know About Stretching For Fitness Until You Read This

If you research the subject of stretching thoroughly, one thing becomes glaringly obvious. There are conflicting views as to what is or is not true, what you should or should not do and how you should or should not do it.

Basically the latest research does not support all of the information that many fitness 'gurus' have been handing down for years. So what does the latest research say? I'm glad you asked!

1. Stretching is goal specific. Meaning the way you'll stretch as part of your cardiovascular or resistance routine will not be the same as the way you'll stretch for improving your range of motion.

2. Stretching after exercise does not prevent post-exercise muscle soreness. There is also little or no support for the theory that stretching immediately before exercise can prevent either overuse or acute sports injuries.

3. Dynamic or Ballistic Stretching is heading the way of the dinosaur. The forceful, jerky movements have been known to cause micro tears in the muscle fibers. Bouncing and pulling your muscles with force is one way way ticket to soreness, injury and joint pain.

4. Static stretching is one of the safest ways to stretch. After a proper warm-up, assume a maximum stretch position for each muscle and hold for 30 seconds. Shorter durations do not produce desired results and longer durations do not significantly increase benefits.

5. PNF Stretching is a technique which involves a combination of alternating static stretches with isometric muscle contracting. It was first used by physical therapists for injury prevention and rehabilitation. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) is considered the fastest way to improve range of motion.

6. Visualize while stretching each muscle group. You've got to be 'plugged in' mentally to get the best result. Take this quiet stretch time to improve your body awareness. Focus on what you're doing. Even in a recession, I do not think you're too poor to pay attention.

Real Estate Investing – Can You Make It Work?

Real estate investing is one of the hottest and most lucrative types of investing today. With hundreds of people realizing the potential in this type of investing, more and more people are venturing into it. Yet, there are risks that go hand in hand with investing in real estate.

If you don’t know enough about this type of investment plan, you may make mistakes that can cost you a considerable amount of time and money.

Education Is The First Step

Not only do you need to educate yourself about real estate investing procedures and methods, but you should be educating yourself about the property you plan to invest in. If you are determining the right location, you may be tempted to just pick land or buildings that are located in hot spots, but sometimes, that can be a bad thing.

For example, many areas of Southern Florida are facing a crucial downhill slide currently with over investing taking over. Yet, there are plenty of areas that are booming such as in the Midwest. Selecting the right area means doing your homework on the real estate market in those areas.

Financing To Back It Up

It is also essential for you to have the financing to help back up the real estate investing you plan to do. With some help from the right lenders, you’ll be able to secure a loan that will be allowing you to make money off the purchase of your real estate.

The key is to compare several lenders to get the best possible rates and terms that will allow this to happen. You can easily do this, though, by looking for quotes right on the web and comparing them.

Real estate investing is a smart move to make for the educated individual. Taking the time to gain the knowledge and financial backing that is required helps you to make the right decisions so that every one of those decisions can be profitable to you.

JavaScript for Web Design – Advantages and Disadvantages

This article discusses the good and the bad points of using JavaScript in your website designs. It points out the areas where JavaScript excels as a web based programming language and also describes situations where its use can actually detract from the performance of a website.

First of all, JavaScript is a browser based programming language that actually runs client side. This means that any code that you write in JavaScript is delivered along with your web pages and the scripts that you write actually run from within the users’ browser rather than directly on the server that is serving the web page. There are situations where JavaScript is an excellent solution for implementing neat features in a web design but there are also situations where using JavaScript can hurt your websites performance. It is my aim in this article to describe the best ways to use JavaScript and how to circumnavigate the downsides of using this versatile and powerful scripting language.

JavaScript for Web Design – The Advantages

JavaScript is an excellent solution to implement when validating input forms on the client side. This means that if a user forgets to enter his name in a form for instance a JavaScript validation function can popup a message to let him know about the omission. This is a far better solution that having a server side validation routine handle the error because the server does not have to do any additional processing. An asp or php routine could be written to achieve the same task but the JavaScript would not allow the form to be submitted unless it was completed properly in the first place, a much more robust solution!

Another area where JavaScript excels is in the creation of dynamic effects such as rollover images and scripted slideshows, where its use has become commonplace. Because JavaScript runs inside the clients browser it can be used to change the appearance of the users screen after the page has been sent by the server. This allows it to create some very impressive dynamic image effects.

JavaScript for Web Design – The Disadvantages

One of the major draw backs to using JavaScript is that it tends to severely bloat web pages. JavaScript code can quickly add up to hundreds of lines of code if you are using it to do anything even remotely interesting. That said the problem of large chunks of JavaScript code is easily solved by storing the JavaScript code off into separate JavaScript source files that have a .js extension. This cleans up your web page code because the JavaScript code is stored separately to the HTML page itself, leaving a much cleaner and more readable web page.

Because of JavaScript’s tendency to bloat web pages it can be very detrimental to the search engine friendliness of your web site. This is because when a search engine arrives at your site looking for quality content and keywords to determine what your page is al about, the last thing it wants to see is hundreds of lines of JavaScript code. Again, this problem is easily solves by neatly storing JavaScript code away in script files with a .js extension and linking to the script file in your HTML documents.

Conclusion:

JavaScript is a feature rich and useful browser based script that if used properly can achieve some great effects and improve the experience for the end user. There are drawbacks to its use in that it tends to bloat web pages. The key thing to remember is to get the best of both worlds by using JavaScript code in external script files. That way the code is separated from your content so you get all the benefit of JavaScript functionality but without the adverse effects of the associated code bloating.

What Rushing Your Design Project Really Means

If you do not plan to allow enough time for your project to be designed, printed and delivered, then you may still be able to have your project completed in time, but the design will have to be rushed.

This means that your designer will put away other client's work and work late nights, even weekends, to get your project out – but at a price. And the price takes several forms other than just financial.

The cost of rushing your project includes:

– Skipping important parts of the design process: With less time there's often not enough time allowed for a designer to spend much time at all on a creative approach or concept for your project. There also may not be enough time for your designer to present a lot of concepts to you or to go through a lot of revisions. You'll also be rushed through the approval cycle – which means it's more likely that you might miss your deadline.

– Quality may suffer: With less time and more stress the finished product often will not be of as high quality as it could be. In design this could mean poorly prepared files, the details of the design are not always attended to, or that a website is coded poorly. None of this will greatly harm the effectiveness of a finished piece, but it's always nicer to have a beautiful, perfect finished piece that has one that's almost all the way there.

– Financial costs: Just like any other profession a designer will charge extra for the late nights and other sacrifices that a rush project requires. It's an industry standard to charge one and a half times the normal cost of a project to rush it.

– Not being able to ask your audience: I highly recommend that you run your desgns-in-progress past your best clients and your target audience. Doing this sort of mini focus-group will enable your clients to give you invaluable feedback on your designs, your text, and their impact on your potential clients. If your project is rushed, then there's often no time to run the design options by your clients to get their input – and you'll lose out on a valuable resource.

Lack of planning can cost you a lot extra. So I suggest allowing plenty of time to design well thought-out materials, at a leisurely pace. This will cost you less and will often produce a more effective design.